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Never Mind Aboot Spanish, Basque, Catalonia Jon: Whar Are the Ingin Johnnies Of Times Gone By?


Gedee

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There'll no' be sae many oot there that mind aboot the Ingin Johnnies, wha used tae go aroond the auld streets & tenements o' Dundee?

Chappin on the doors selling thon big Spanish Onions. It wis a bit seasonal, but when they did arrive, they came in big numbers fae Spain.

The ingins were in chains, aroond their necks & awe roond their bikes. Mind, as a wee lad, asking meh maw, whar they come fae & being

telt they awe come fae Spain...I looked at their broken doon, brakeless, near tyreless machines, wondering how did they manage to travel

that distance on them on !! (It seems the hulls o the ships were stacked fu' wi new seasons spring ingins & the auld bilkes were chucked

on tap. And off they went :)

And those ither traders on the horse & cairties (wi trumpet) Rag & Bone Men, Knife Sharpeners, Fruit, Veg, Coal Men...And Fish Wullie :happyyes:

Jist efter the war when a great deal o' fowk in Scotland (industrial cities) had little (nothing really) & in many cases living in total squalor

living in condemned housing wi' NO Facilities...gas/electric power, proper running water ootside lavvies etc. Limited food (Ration Books)

NHS came into being in 1948. A big blessing for the majority of the population. Before that there was a lot o' make-dos & hand me doon.

Eh credit the positive turn of fortune on the introduction o' the NHS...But also the Ingin Johnies :)Whitever yir age gies yir memories :wub:

Nae need for the much younger lads & lasses tae feel left oot. Tell us aboot yir ain Grandads/Grannies/Dads/Mums Best Memories:chaplin:

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I suspect it is as a result of consumers being able to purchase fruit and veg all the year round from countries throughout the world.

Fruit and veg is on sale in supermarkets all year whereas prior to the 1970’s it was seasonal.

I can remember my mother purchasing “new” potatoes each year in May which could be boiled.

I preferred mashed potatoes but you did not get them until October and they were called “old” potatoes.

The younger posters on this forum will possibly have never heard of new or old potatoes 

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7 minutes ago, islaydarkblue said:

I suspect it is as a result of consumers being able to purchase fruit and veg all the year round from countries throughout the world.

Fruit and veg is on sale in supermarkets all year whereas prior to the 1970’s it was seasonal.

I can remember my mother purchasing “new” potatoes each year in May which could be boiled.

I preferred mashed potatoes but you did not get them until October and they were called “old” potatoes.

The younger posters on this forum will possibly have never heard of new or old potatoes 

The New Potatoes were a treat Islay .... Fine on their own. But a bit special wi "best" butter (Cheap marg, like echo, didnae cut it at awe)

Talking auld potatoes...The new pots werenae guid for chips. Auld tatties for chips, done in dripping, sat, vinegar , wrapped in newspaper.

Steamy Hot Chippers, wi' condensation running doon the windae. poke o' hot, vinegary, chips.Twa pickled ingins & hot peh. Happy Days:wub:

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Well, GeeDee, I think you're looking at a very small number of forum posters who can recall seeing Ingin Johnnies turning up at their doors, or more likely, are prepared to admit to being that auld! ....I think it's safe to say we'd still not won the league by the time they vanished from the streets? 

I do remember seeing them in the Ferry, though I'm unconvinced that they all wore navy & white hooped shirts & navy berets & had taches.....I suspect that image was a consequence of Beano & Dandy 'imaging'.....same as their perennial burglars, who wore a similar 'uniform', but all had zoro-like eye-masks & a sack over their shoulder, with 'swag' written on it. I guess we were still very impressionable kids in those decades! :D

Tatties....I never heard the expression 'old potatoes'...if they weren't 'new potatoes' (had to be butter...marg was as disgusting as the modern 'lowers your cholestorol' artificial crap is), they were usually referred to by type, eg Kerr's Pinks, King Edwards, etc, as older pre-war parents/grandparents knew what the characteristics were. One type was easier/faster to boil, but suffered in damp weather, and they were the type that unfortunately had been largely planted in the 'tattie famine' decades & turned to mush. I'm sure I recall each type had a different planting/howkin' period, so the supply could be 'phased' a bit by planting a few different types (though this bit might be 'age-related fiction'). :chin:

My parents & grandfather (mother's side) + me as a toddler 'emigrated' in the mid-50's from the 2-room wee flats in the 'beachie' streets of The Ferry (Fisher St & Fort St - one of which is now a room in The Fishermans Hotel), to the 'outer edge' of Barnhill, beside the 'new' prefabs....a bit run-down old house, but it had a long garden, so nearly all the veg & fruit I recall came from there....tatties, carrots, sprouts, peas, rasps, strawbs, blackcurrants, apples (cookers). The only time I recall seeing an orange & a red apple was in the xmas santa stocking. We also had a Croll's Nursery 'farm shop' along the street, where everything we didn't grow could be bought (in season, of course). Tatties & cooking apples were always wrapped in newspaper, put in boxes, and stored in some dark/cold bit of the house, and lasted a surprising time.

Fresh fish was a staple part of our diet, though my father was the first of his centuries-old Ferry fishing family who didn't work in the fish trade....his father was a trawler skipper, and his 2 eldest brothers crew members, but the Ferry's fishing trade had all but died by the time he was an adult. There was, though, still an occasional supply of mackrel, sometimes haddock, through 'rowing boats trips' & old connections with the Arbroath & Fife boats. The Ferry also had Carnegie's fish shop, and the owner was (literally) a magician, a member of Dundee Magic Circle....and always entertained young kids with his conjuring tricks.

I'm sure I recall monday to friday 'tea' being largely the same 5 things on the same days, every week....possibly dictated by street deliveries, and by not having a fridge....when you got it, you had to cook it! Weekends were for the huge (& probably ancient) 'black pot', with a leg of mutton or ham shank, or a chicken, cooked with the veg & barley, to make both the soup & the main course. Saturday dinner (lunch, to the younger ones!) was always from Goodfellow & Steven, pehs & bridies....until I 'rebelled' at the disgustingly solid lump of gristle & mutton in the middle :sick:...I ate the pastry (which tasted great! :happyyes:)....and when confronted with the obligatory lecture about 'starving africans', replied with the customary cheek 'well, send it to them & see if they like it'....while I ducked, just in case! 

I certainly recall the black-faced coalman (scary!) delivering the sacks of the smokiest coal imaginable, the occasional 'tinker' selling pots & offering to sharpen knives, both still using a cart & a huge Clydesdale-type horse. Our street was still largely car-free, and the old gas lampies became the goalposts after school. The milk had to be brought in asap, in winter it froze & the cream pushed the foil off the top, or in summer it became warm & the birds got to it & ruined the cream with whatever was in their beaks (eg, bits of insects/earth :sadno:). 

As for the chippers....an occasional fish supper was still 'a luxury', but having such a large Ferry family, one of my aunts was married to the owner of Glenday's chipper, and our 'family discount' was free chips anytime we bought suppers. This worked fine for me, calling in for my free poke of chips, vinegar & lots of salt after scouts on a Friday....think it set up a long-standing 'addiction' to salty food, though. Alas, there was no such comparable 'discount' in the pub one of my uncles owned! :tears:

I was just thinking, reading this again for typos....what a load of crap we post when there are no matches to occupy us :lol2:

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28 minutes ago, WoodStein said:

Well, GeeDee, I think you're looking at a very small number of forum posters who can recall seeing Ingin Johnnies turning up at their doors, or more likely, are prepared to admit to being that auld! ....I think it's safe to say we'd still not won the league by the time they vanished from the streets? 

I do remember seeing them in the Ferry, though I'm unconvinced that they all wore navy & white hooped shirts & navy berets & had taches.....I suspect that image was a consequence of Beano & Dandy 'imaging'.....same as their perennial burglars, who wore a similar 'uniform', but all had zoro-like eye-masks & a sack over their shoulder, with 'swag' written on it. I guess we were still very impressionable kids in those decades! :D

Tatties....I never heard the expression 'old potatoes'...if they weren't 'new potatoes' (had to be butter...marg was as disgusting as the modern 'lowers your cholestorol' artificial crap is), they were usually referred to by type, eg Kerr's Pinks, King Edwards, etc, as older pre-war parents/grandparents knew what the characteristics were. One type was easier/faster to boil, but suffered in damp weather, and they were the type that unfortunately had been largely planted in the 'tattie famine' decades & turned to mush. I'm sure I recall each type had a different planting/howkin' period, so the supply could be 'phased' a bit by planting a few different types (though this bit might be 'age-related fiction'). :chin:

My parents & grandfather (mother's side) + me as a toddler 'emigrated' in the mid-50's from the 2-room wee flats in the 'beachie' streets of The Ferry (Fisher St & Fort St - one of which is now a room in The Fishermans Hotel), to the 'outer edge' of Barnhill, beside the 'new' prefabs....a bit run-down old house, but it had a long garden, so nearly all the veg & fruit I recall came from there....tatties, carrots, sprouts, peas, rasps, strawbs, blackcurrants, apples (cookers). The only time I recall seeing an orange & a red apple was in the xmas santa stocking. We also had a Croll's Nursery 'farm shop' along the street, where everything we didn't grow could be bought (in season, of course). Tatties & cooking apples were always wrapped in newspaper, put in boxes, and stored in some dark/cold bit of the house, and lasted a surprising time.

Fresh fish was a staple part of our diet, though my father was the first of his centuries-old Ferry fishing family who didn't work in the fish trade....his father was a trawler skipper, and his 2 eldest brothers crew members, but the Ferry's fishing trade had all but died by the time he was an adult. There was, though, still an occasional supply of mackrel, sometimes haddock, through 'rowing boats trips' & old connections with the Arbroath & Fife boats. The Ferry also had Carnegie's fish shop, and the owner was (literally) a magician, a member of Dundee Magic Circle....and always entertained young kids with his conjuring tricks.

I'm sure I recall monday to friday 'tea' being largely the same 5 things on the same days, every week....possibly dictated by street deliveries, and by not having a fridge....when you got it, you had to cook it! Weekends were for the huge (& probably ancient) 'black pot', with a leg of mutton or ham shank, or a chicken, cooked with the veg & barley, to make both the soup & the main course. Saturday dinner (lunch, to the younger ones!) was always from Goodfellow & Steven, pehs & bridies....until I 'rebelled' at the disgustingly solid lump of gristle & mutton in the middle :sick:...I ate the pastry (which tasted great! :happyyes:)....and when confronted with the obligatory lecture about 'starving africans', replied with the customary cheek 'well, send it to them & see if they like it'....while I ducked, just in case! 

I certainly recall the black-faced coalman (scary!) delivering the sacks of the smokiest coal imaginable, the occasional 'tinker' selling pots & offering to sharpen knives, both still using a cart & a huge Clydesdale-type horse. Our street was still largely car-free, and the old gas lampies became the goalposts after school. The milk had to be brought in asap, in winter it froze & the cream pushed the foil off the top, or in summer it became warm & the birds got to it & ruined the cream with whatever was in their beaks (eg, bits of insects/earth :sadno:). 

As for the chippers....an occasional fish supper was still 'a luxury', but having such a large Ferry family, one of my aunts was married to the owner of Glenday's chipper, and our 'family discount' was free chips anytime we bought suppers. This worked fine for me, calling in for my free poke of chips, vinegar & lots of salt after scouts on a Friday....think it set up a long-standing 'addiction' to salty food, though. Alas, there was no such comparable 'discount' in the pub one of my uncles owned! :tears:

I was just thinking, reading this again for typos....what a load of crap we post when there are no matches to occupy us :lol2:

Hi WoodStein.

Thank you for your comments about “All our yesterday’s in Dundee and Broughty Ferry).

Whilst reading your post I said to my wife that things were slow on this forum when there are no football matches.

She enjoyed both your post and Gedee’s and she remarked that she that  it was a long time since anyone had mentioned Echo margarine.

i do not mind these vegetable type spreads on my toast when I have a sandwich for lunch providing it also has cold meat and cheese in it.

My parents lived next door to George P Grant the bookmaker (G P Grants Promotions).

When Mr Grant’s daughter Dorothy got married in the early 1960’s anyone who turned up at their door prior to the wedding with a present was taken in for drink.

The onion Jonny turned up the door to sell his onions and he was taken in to the house and given a drink.

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15 minutes ago, WoodStein said:

I was just thinking, reading this again for typos....what a load of crap we post when there are no matches to occupy us :lol2:

Hello Wood ... The reason I highlighted the last line o' yir fine post (memories & comments) is  because I entirely disagree :)

I am aware that the kind of Topic & Posts that follow, do NOT aye go doon l too well with many DFC posters on  a Fitba Forum.

However, there are are Sub Headings where they can be & (imo) should be included (especially when the fitba has gone quiet)

Introducing ither topics, however daft...(did somebody shout on me) :wacko: are fine (imo)...as ithers are exhausted & regurgitated.

There's some great stories/historical memories in you post above. And I''d be surprised if others (whitever age) didnae like 'em.

It's no awe aboot.... "eh can mind back then when..." (Personally eh find fowk interesting) Especially the fowk fae Dundee & the

area aroond And definitelely those that have an alleigance tae the Mighty Dark Blues OK tbh, eh love Scotland & Scottish Fowk :wub:

(The first Scottish Early New Tatties (Arrans) came fae Ayrshire. Ootside Scotland New tatties were fae Jersey)...Braw Stuff:chaplin:

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(PS ....  I think the present Crime rate & unsolved crime rate has went well up in modern times)

But there again, it's no surprising.  As Wood points oot, the local burglars, in the far-off times,

going aboot their dastardly business in the weel recognised strippet jersey & wee black mask,

didnae mak it too hard fot the local polis Of coorse the main giveaway wis the "SWAG BAG" :ph34r:

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1 hour ago, Gedee said:

Hello Wood ... The reason I highlighted the last line o' yir fine post (memories & comments) is  because I entirely disagree :)

 

As you know, G, I'm rarely serious with most of my posts, including the one above.....but I feel certain there might have been a few younger heids nodding in agreement with the 'crap' bittie :P   

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4 hours ago, Gedee said:

(PS ....  I think the present Crime rate & unsolved crime rate has went well up in modern times)

But there again, it's no surprising.  As Wood points oot, the local burglars, in the far-off times,

going aboot their dastardly business in the weel recognised strippet jersey & wee black mask,

didnae mak it too hard fot the local polis Of coorse the main giveaway wis the "SWAG BAG" :ph34r:

Hi Gedee 

i am surprised that you did not mention fritters when you were speaking about chip shops.

I seem to remember that every May the chip shops put up the  price of chips and blamed the “new” potatoes as the reason.

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11 hours ago, islaydarkblue said:

Hi Gedee 

i am surprised that you did not mention fritters when you were speaking about chip shops.

I seem to remember that every May the chip shops put up the  price of chips and blamed the “new” potatoes as the reason.

It was only quite recently I relised "fritters" were no' longer made  ....No that I ever liked them (I've no been a chipper for decades)

Think in fairness to chippers, new potatoes were expensive to buy, when the auld ains became jis too aald for eating" (sprouting)

I'm no sure whit the justification is now, for the overall high price o tatties, when they are readily availble. Mind price £5, half cwt.

(There's no doot tatties were the "main stay" o' the diet o' the poor, low-paid, or non-working family. Tatties took up awe the plate)

 

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3 hours ago, Gedee said:

It was only quite recently I relised "fritters" were no' longer made  ....No that I ever liked them (I've no been a chipper for decades)

Think in fairness to chippers, new potatoes were expensive to buy, when the auld ains became jis too aald for eating" (sprouting)

I'm no sure whit the justification is now, for the overall high price o tatties, when they are readily availble. Mind price £5, half cwt.

(There's no doot tatties were the "main stay" o' the diet o' the poor, low-paid, or non-working family. Tatties took up awe the plate)

 

Hi Gedee.

A couple of years ago I was able to purchase fritters in the Bridge chip shop which is sutated in Logie Street next to the corner of Loons Road. 

Chippers do not always have fritters, you just have to ask.

In my opinion the reason that the price of potatoes is so high is because of speculators.

In 1988 I worked on the mobile bank based in Perth.

We used to go to West Cumberland Farmers (WCF) in Abernethy who stored potatoes on behalf of customers. In frosty weather they had to switch heaters to prevent the potatoes “frosting”. Apparently they stored potatoes on behalf of Arab customers who were based in the Middle East and these potatoes were released after being sold at futures markets throughout the winter period. 

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1 hour ago, islaydarkblue said:

Hi Gedee.

A couple of years ago I was able to purchase fritters in the Bridge chip shop which is sutated in Logie Street next to the corner of Loons Road. 

Chippers do not always have fritters, you just have to ask.

In my opinion the reason that the price of potatoes is so high is because of speculators.

In 1988 I worked on the mobile bank based in Perth.

We used to go to West Cumberland Farmers (WCF) in Abernethy who stored potatoes on behalf of customers. In frosty weather they had to switch heaters to prevent the potatoes “frosting”. Apparently they stored potatoes on behalf of Arab customers who were based in the Middle East and these potatoes were released after being sold at futures markets throughout the winter period. 

I'll need tae move away fae  this particular area (tatties) .... Or eh will be driving my  fellow Dees (lads & lasses) mad  :jawdrop:

But tatties (like tomatoes) was once upon a time very much specialised subject for me (Obsessed wi growing full range)

There again, I've yet to meet a man that disnae develop a bit o' a life-long obsession wi his plums :rolleyes: The development of

Specialised Potatoes for a Particular purpose (& clever marketing) by certain "smart people" allowed them to charge what

ever they wanted in the Big Supermarkets (eg Roosters) Taking full advantage of general public's lack of knowledge (IMO)

Very few folks left who are interested in growing a full range of organic fruit & vegetables. No criticism. that life tho':chaplin:

 

 

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