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The Word 'Dreich' Is Weel Up There It Seems As a Scottish Favourite Word. Whit Is Your Favourite?


Gedee

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https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-50476008

Link above, highlights 10 used scottish favourite words.

In the main eh kinda speak (I suppose) "proper english"

But eh've nae problem at awe, drappin' in the odd scottish word or twa, intae meh general conversation.

Or even posts on here, when mood takes me ... Whit aboot yirselves?  Mither's Tongue/Queens English?

(And there might be a wee silhouette picture at the bottom of link above you might want to click onto) ;)

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" see you at the back of five"---- an all encompassing excuse to meet someone between  5.01 and 5. 59   without being accused of being late or early.

                                           Most descriptive..... He wiz like a drookit rat .

            

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  • 2 months later...
2 hours ago, dblair said:

Was suprised by “outwith” is that really just Scottish? 🤷‍♂️
 

Apparently so...astonished me too...in the early 80's, writing the draft of a hillwalking club magazine, one of our 'proppa english' (white settler, tae, he wis) colleagues on the committee scored out my comment about our weekend trips to hills "outwith day-trip distance", and substituted "too far for a day trip". He got a few more weel-kent Scots expressions in my reply :lol2: 

Many of those twats pretend they don't understand them....eh didnae think 'outwith' was a' that hard tae grasp.

Quite a lot of old Scots words are far more colourful & descriptive than the duller english equivalents.

.....like 'glaikit' above, which may have featured in my irritated reply.  :)  

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"Drookit" is one of my favourites, far more apt to describe that bad hillwalking day feeling, soaked through every layer, head to foot, insides the boots as well.

GeDee may occasionally encounter the classic "fair firfauchen" up in that NE corner of Aiberdeenshire, when a visitor is just utterly knackered, trachled & wabbit, all in one. 

Living in the west of the 'Shire, the joiner's often-used "T-till" amused me....essentially describing something attached at 90 degrees....or a car being broadsided at a T-junction. "Thon wa's nae t-till" would warn you that your garden/house wall wasn't exactly vertical & micht fa' doon at any point. 

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