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Who was Billy Steel? We all know the name but why is he somebody worth talking about 70 years after he played the game?

Derby County won the FA Cup in 1946, making them the first Cup winners after World War II. The Rams were keen to build on that success so they smashed the British transfer record to sign Scotland's most exciting inside forward Billy Steel for a record sum of £15,500 from Morton.

There was no doubting his quality at Derby but he was not a popular figure at the Baseball Ground. His teammates felt he raised his game against London teams but otherwise wasn't that interested. They also were annoyed that he was earning good money on the side writing articles for newspapers. As a result he became available and Dundee FC offered a British record transfer fee of £22,500.

Steel made quite an impact at Dens as the Dark Blues won back-to-back League Cups, the first team to achieve the feat.

Did Dundee sign the world's best player? He was certainly a contender. 150,000 packed Wembley to watch Great Britain batter the Rest of Europe 6-1 and Steel was the star player who scored the goal of the game when he smashed the ball into the net from 30 yards.

 

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I asked my old man who at 92 has good memories of these days.  Firstly he said it was a massive signing at the time ... record fee ... real star at the top of his game which was why he added 10000 to

Who was Billy Steel? We all know the name but why is he somebody worth talking about 70 years after he played the game? Derby County won the FA Cup in 1946, making them the first Cup winners afte

but he was not a popular figure at the Baseball Ground. Not sure he  was all that popular at Dens either. Always remember as a kid waiting at the main entrance to get some autographs when a big r

3 hours ago, Cobra said:

Who was Billy Steel? We all know the name but why is he somebody worth talking about 70 years after he played the game?

Derby County won the FA Cup in 1946, making them the first Cup winners after World War II. The Rams were keen to build on that success so they smashed the British transfer record to sign Scotland's most exciting inside forward Billy Steel for a record sum of £15,500 from Morton.

There was no doubting his quality at Derby but he was not a popular figure at the Baseball Ground. His teammates felt he raised his game against London teams but otherwise wasn't that interested. They also were annoyed that he was earning good money on the side writing articles for newspapers. As a result he became available and Dundee FC offered a British record transfer fee of £22,500.

Steel made quite an impact at Dens as the Dark Blues won back-to-back League Cups, the first team to achieve the feat.

Did Dundee sign the world's best player? He was certainly a contender. 150,000 packed Wembley to watch Great Britain batter the Rest of Europe 6-1 and Steel was the star player who scored the goal of the game when he smashed the ball into the net from 30 yards.

 

but he was not a popular figure at the Baseball Ground.

Not sure he  was all that popular at Dens either. Always remember as a kid waiting at the main entrance to get some autographs when a big row broke out inside. A few minutes later Brown and Boyd came out and I heard Brown say it was all because Cowie was injured and Steele was fuming because he wasn't made captain. It's all very vague now but I'm sure there were stories of him being very disruptive.

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My father and grandfather both raved about him all the time and were in absolutely no doubt he was the best they had ever seen. My father in particular always used to describe players that he liked as "no a bad player but he's nae Billy Steel". He even used that description of my favourite player as a lad, no need to guess Gillie!!

The book Billy Steel Scotland's Little Maestro by Bob MacAlinden is worth reading.

 

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6 hours ago, troodee1893 said:

My father and grandfather both raved about him all the time and were in absolutely no doubt he was the best they had ever seen. My father in particular always used to describe players that he liked as "no a bad player but he's nae Billy Steel". He even used that description of my favourite player as a lad, no need to guess Gillie!!

The book Billy Steel Scotland's Little Maestro by Bob MacAlinden is worth reading.

 

My dad was the same. Nobody could touch Billy Steele in his eyes. He also used to go mental every time a Scotland squad was announced and Bobby Cox was omitted. 

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I asked my old man who at 92 has good memories of these days.  Firstly he said it was a massive signing at the time ... record fee ... real star at the top of his game which was why he added 10000 to the crowd at his debut.  Then secondly he was a terrific player .. attacking midfielder and a very clever player according to dad and he was in a good team although as he was a perfectionist he did scream at his team mates relentlessly.  He also remembered the UK bs Rest of World game being very prestigious match and the fact steel played was a great honour back in 47.

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