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The Sporting Post.

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I used to go get this for my Grandad every Saturday when I was younger (much younger) 😂

Sadly, there is nothing like this today, and would enjoy reading about our games (home and away).

Anyone else miss this fine paper on a Sat night?

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Mind even a  bairn (pre-school & in primary) my dad, although a constant reader of books, seemed to be quite selective on what newspapers were bought and brought into the house. It was maybe a ref

Someone gave me a lend of around 50 Sporting Posts from the 60s to the 80s for the website so they will be going up soon 👍🏻

I used to go get this for my Grandad every Saturday when I was younger (much younger) 😂 Sadly, there is nothing like this today, and would enjoy reading about our games (home and away). Anyo

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Was one of the highlights of my Saturday night. When the final whistle blew at Dens I'd race down the hill to meet my grandparents who'd have a bag of chips waiting. I'd then get the train to Perth and by the time I got there the bus station they would have the Sporting Post. I'd then have a couple of hours to check out scores on the way to Inverness (and if I was lucky there would be something interesting in the paper about the Dee). 

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8 minutes ago, Cobra said:

Was one of the highlights of my Saturday night. When the final whistle blew at Dens I'd race down the hill to meet my grandparents who'd have a bag of chips waiting. I'd then get the train to Perth and by the time I got there the bus station they would have the Sporting Post. I'd then have a couple of hours to check out scores on the way to Inverness (and if I was lucky there would be something interesting in the paper about the Dee). 

My Grandad would come around to our house for his tea every Saturday (Mince and Tatties, as that was his favourite).  after tea around about 6-7pm, he would get me to run up to the local shop to get the sporting post. He would give me 50p for my trouble and I would read about the match (whether I had been at the game or not).

Ahh stories like this:

SP 73.JPG

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When I was a paperboy I used to deliver the Maidens' papers, had to go into the bar to hand it over, always left the pub minus a bunch of Sporting Posts, guys in the bar always gave me a quid each for them, then I'd nip to the shop along the road and replace what I'd sold so I could finish my round. Tidy wee profit for a 13yr old 😂

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8 minutes ago, Ricky Spanish said:

When I was a paperboy I used to deliver the Maidens' papers, had to go into the bar to hand it over, always left the pub minus a bunch of Sporting Posts, guys in the bar always gave me a quid each for them, then I'd nip to the shop along the road and replace what I'd sold so I could finish my round. Tidy wee profit for a 13yr old 😂

I like your style. 😁👍

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1 hour ago, TheDarkBlues said:

I used to go get this for my Grandad every Saturday when I was younger (much younger) 😂

Sadly, there is nothing like this today, and would enjoy reading about our games (home and away).

Anyone else miss this fine paper on a Sat night?

Simpler but magical times.

"Dees go nap"

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Mind even a  bairn (pre-school & in primary) my dad, although a constant reader of books, seemed to be quite selective on what newspapers were bought and brought into the house. It was maybe a reflection of the times and although he had not too bad a job, he maybe felt even then, most papers were full of junk (God knows what he thought of today's papers) I don't remember any DCT's papers  coming into our house on a regular basis.

Although That did not deter my own interest in books & newspapers ... My "Grannie" who I seemed to spend half my life with, lived in one of the old tenements on Blackness road .... The usual story: nae electricity for cooking/heating/lighting, no inside toilet, baths hot water etc, etc)

But there was a tremendous "warmth" about the whole place.She was aye loving & friendly.As were awe the neighbours.

It was a cosy "lived in" hoose, in every way

And the coal fire which seemed always on, always had the big black kettle which wis always on the hob on the boil for makin tea. And on the other side of the coal fire, was the Big Black Pot.That was always "biling awa" wi' the best thick, homemade soup you ever tasted (ham/ beef/mutton/marrow bones) when it wisnae soup it was either, beef or mutton stew, which anyone was expected to help themselves to (I used to bring up meh pals fae the Joey's Primary efter skale, for a steaming bowl)...Spooned intae a bowl & supped up wi a spoon & a chunk o' real bread. Then a cup o' biling tea wi condensed milk, this time fae the cup to the saucer where it was eagerly supped up ... Happy Days :happyyes:

I know I've briefly diverted topic, but you'll gather there was plenty happy childhood memories there in that two roomed hoose that raised a family of including parents of 11-12-13 people).

So looking efter a wee skinny bairn like me noo again for long spells, in the 1940-50's, when times were tough (food rationing and awe that) wis nae effort for her ...She was a Good Woman :wub:

And what has all this got to do with papers? Well every thing really....

I am not sure if she bought all the DCT newspapers that were in that hoose, or whether the neighbours swapped/shared all the papers around & with each other,, but I can guarantee that EVERY DCT publication (inc sporting post) found it's way to that hoose. And more importantly was read from cover to cover by her... And eventually me, as she taught me the joy of the written word, in both newspapers, magazines & books.

Of course then there was no TV. And with most houses (in the poorer section) not having electricity, no instant radio. newspapers was the main method of keeping up with the news...And the competition then helped make for better journalistic standards ...Well at least compared to the muck we're expected to see/read/ hear/watch Today

Hope this over-large personal post has not been too boring lads & lasses ... Fond Memories:chaplin:

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52 minutes ago, Gedee said:

.... The usual story: nae electricity for cooking/heating/lighting, no inside toilet, baths hot water etc, etc)

Sounds just like my place now Gedee! 

Great story and memories -. factor in Utd being even shitier then than now and it must've been bliss!

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I've made my position clear in the past that imo the Sporting Post was the best in Scotland, anyway. The Glasgow, Edinburgh and other Saturday evening sports papers were odd pink or green efforts on dodgy quality paper and the ink always came off badly on your hands (probably never any use as bog paper in those days). The main difference was the speed that the early edition had the scores in the 'stop press' and info from the games and how quickly the final edition was out with full match reports not just of the local teams games but for all of Scottish football.

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Used to have to queue to get one. The van would pull up outside the newsagent across from Doc's and throw them onto the pavement. Whoever grabbed them and took them in would get theirs first, then the paper laddies would get theirs for delivery followed by the people in the queue. Very rare for them not to run out within ten minutes of hitting the pavement.

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12 hours ago, Ricky Spanish said:

When I was a paperboy I used to deliver the Maidens' papers, had to go into the bar to hand it over, always left the pub minus a bunch of Sporting Posts, guys in the bar always gave me a quid each for them, then I'd nip to the shop along the road and replace what I'd sold so I could finish my round. Tidy wee profit for a 13yr old 😂

A proper St Mary's boy. Magic.

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I used to deliver them from Sandy's. Was a right pain having to go back after 6 for them. But a great paper none the less.

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1 hour ago, Prince Buster said:

Used to have to queue to get one. The van would pull up outside the newsagent across from Doc's and throw them onto the pavement. Whoever grabbed them and took them in would get theirs first, then the paper laddies would get theirs for delivery followed by the people in the queue. Very rare for them not to run out within ten minutes of hitting the pavement.

Folk used to queue up in and outside DCTs office in Bank Street in those days to get them straight off the press, even before Tammy Sma' got them to sell outside Boots. He was a cracker. You handed over your thruppence or tanner whatever it was at the time and like a fast draw gun fighter the tully or post was flicked out at you at a ridiculous speed. Some found it difficult figure out exactly what he shouted out to attract buyers, sometimes it was just a long 'eeeehhhhh' and sometimes he got carried away and went Tully, Tulleeeeegraaaapphhhh, Tully. A legend!

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